July 21st, 2018

Governments dictating ‘believe as we do or else’


By Letter to the Editor on May 10, 2018.

Re: “Alta. reverses adoption stance,” May 3 Lethbridge Herald.

The fact is that this headline is only half true. Alberta reverses because the Justice Centre for Constitutional Freedoms lawyer took the Alberta Children’s Services Ministry to court when they decided that the evangelical Christian couple would be unable to help a child with sexual identity issues. So believe as we do or else; this is Alberta.

Justin Trudeau is no different with Canada’s summer jobs program, which now has a restriction in funding to students working for volunteer organizations. In their application they must now confirm the organization’s support for legal abortions as a Charter right. Several organizations, including the Mustard Seed, cannot do that against their conscience.

Canada is certainly well on the road becoming a post-Christian country. There must be more pushback as in the adoption case. We really must wonder were we are going as a nation. However, I must commend Jason Kenney on his strong stand against the non-Christian stand of Justin’s summer jobs program.

Hans Visser

Taber

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11 Responses to “Governments dictating ‘believe as we do or else’”

  1. snoutspot4 says:

    “Justice Centre for Constitutional Freedoms lawyer…) – highly paid mouthpiece, perhaps the infamous John Carpay?

    “So believe as we do or else; this is Alberta.” – you mean like you are commanding other Albertans to believe as you do or else? Kind of ironic there, no?

    “In their application they must now confirm the organization’s support for legal abortions as a Charter right.” False (the requirement is to uphold the Charter rights of all citizens).

    “Canada is certainly well on the road becoming a post-Christian country.” True (and a welcome change – separation of church and state)

    In short another missive from the coven to tell us that “we” are being oppressed by the government because “we” aren’t allowed to be oppressed by Han’s Christian government rules. Boggles the mind.

  2. IMO says:

    Canada is NOT a Christian country. But, Canada IS a country in which Christianity is practised.

    On the basis of the following data, the motivation for constant assertions that Christians are being oppressed in this country appears suspect.

    Christianity is the largest religion in Canada, with Roman Catholics having the most adherents. Christians, representing 67.3% of the population, are followed by people having no religion with 23.9% of the total population. Islam is the second largest religion in Canada, practised by 3.2% of the population.
    http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/130508/dq130508b-eng.htm?HPA

  3. Tony Pargeter says:

    The disturbing affinity for victimhood and oppression is only one of the problems with Christianity in particular, although overall, Islam is an even worse taskmaster for its unfortunate victims. Five times a day, nose to the floor to show true submission, the meaning of the word “Islam”…..what on earth is the appeal of that?
    Walking down the hall in a catholic school and seeing all the crucifixes on the walls brings torture porn to mind. Therefore, any reasonable observer would conclude that religion certainly has no place in our schools either. After all, extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence, and education relies on the truth, not myth. Myth as a subject, fine, but obviously NOT as the entire context as it is in catholic schools. They are doubling down on the “permeation of faith” as they are rightly challenged on this central, untrue premise.
    I have never understood, the passive and weird appeal of all this suffering, sacrifice and guilt. But because of this, a corollary to the assumption that some punishing, watchful god even exists, who also “loves” you, makes a declaration of “faith” akin to a declaration of mental illness.
    I regret to inform such people that objectively, from outside of the bubble, you are all members of a cult.

    • IMO says:

      Do you weigh the same as a duck, Tony Pargeter?

      Are you made of wood?

      Do you float?

      There was a time in Canada, Tony Pargeter, that your vehement anti-Christian and general all ’round anti-religion rant may have seen you charged with witchcraft!

      Who knew?

      http://www.canadashistory.ca/explore/french-canada/sorcery-in-new-france

      • Tony Pargeter says:

        Yes, why on earth would anyone be anti-Christian or anti-religion??!! No wonder you people have to cluster together, to keep yourselves convinced and to avoid all the “ranters” like myself who are not as “gentle and kind”, not to mention precious as yourselves.
        What’s to despise about the pernicious delusion and set of ideas that is religion? Could it be the way it inveigles itself so insidiously into the receptive, vulnerable and precious human mind? Especially if introduced when young, which is obviously the strategy of increasingly defensive believers (“Little Lambs” preschool program at Immanuel Christian Church?!)
        Why are the religious so increasingly defensive I wonder?
        I saw a program on PBS where a young woman put on a helmet that was created to stimulate the part of her brain that has been linked to religious belief. There IS such a thing. Then she was left alone in a room for a period of time. What she reported when she came out was that she had a strong feeling of a “presence” in the room with her. So this structural, vigilant aspect, along with a propensity for magical, imaginative thinking, when coupled with fear can be seen as the source of the god idea. A great manipulator of people historically as well. And the source of centuries of intractable war. Another bonus.
        What I insist on is the admission that it is just another idea and only that. Meditation would be a more natural coping mechanism, more useful but is not enough for the more special religious people, they appropriate that so casually, (as they do all of human nature), calling it “prayer.”
        None of this makes it true. I am a huge fan of what is true and see it as the best thing about us, hard though it is. Religion is just a personal panacea and people are entitled to that, but the insistence on pushing it even a shred more into the public sphere is what inspires the ranters such as myself. Obviously the disproportionately strong need for public sanction speaks to how shaky this idea actually is.

        • biff says:

          t.p – while i do not discount there may be a greater dimension to existence than life on earth, i agree with you that religion is an indoctrination, and as such, is a way to create in groups and those that are consequently excluded. we see this a lot in southern alberta, where a particular religious group wields quite a bit of power. people get elected to office simply because they belong to this prevailing religious cult – that has a belief basis that is beyond anything sensible, and all more dumbfounding given that it began in a more modern time – post-enlightenment, anyway. this group also has a way of excluding children at school whose families have not chosen to accept the fallacy. truly godly, as god would be all about exclusion. moreover, we know that so much torture and war and killing and hate is borne of religion, as you point out. on the other hand, there are new “religious orders” that center around the bs that are right and left politics, each with glaring blind spots to the greater realities and good.

        • IMO says:

          “You people”? Wow! Tony Pargeter. Where in my comment did I give you the idea that_I_am a Christian or that I subscribe to any other religious persuasion? Or that I am defending Christianity or any other religion?

          Your reply suggests that you are completely unfamiliar with Monty Python and the Holy Grail or you would have recognised the, “Do you weigh the same as a duck?” & etc., and then, hopefully, understood the conceptual link and then had a wee chuckle. But, then, again, you may also not be familiar with the da da art movement thus causing you to miss the conceptual link.

          BTW, you do vehemently rant against religion and oft times rely heavily on ad hominem to do so.

          • snoutspot4 says:

            Bravo/Brava IMO. I thought your reference was hilarious. And I agree with your statement: “BTW, you do vehemently rant against religion and oft times rely heavily on ad hominem to do so.” Who is we?

  4. grinandbearit says:

    The government is requiring that before tax monies be used, there needs to be a clear indication that the organisation will not be working to undermine rights and freedoms guaranteed to all Canadians. Maybe Hans would understand how reasonable this is by thinking through another example. Imagine the local branch of Canadians for Atheist Thought applies for STEP funding from general taxation to have a student work against the right of conservative christians to practice their religion. Would you be OK with that?


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