July 16th, 2018

‘Seedy Saturday’ grows interest for spring planting


By Lethbridge Herald on March 25, 2018.

Tammy Woods of Wildrose Heritage Seed talks about growing garlic and other seeds at "Seedy Saturday" at the LSCO gym. Organizers were expecting about 500 visitors to the second annual seed and gardening fair by the end of Saturday afternoon. Herald photo Tim Kalinowski

Tim Kalinowski

Lethbridge Herald

tkalinowski@lethbridgeherald.com

While winter has been slow in leaving the Lethbridge area, for those coming down to the “Seedy Saturday” seed swap at the Lethbridge Senior Citizens Organization gymnasium on Saturday they could at least get some subtle sense of spring amid the stalls and tables of green and growing things.

About 500 people were expected to go through the doors at the second annual event.

“It’s a grassroots event for people who interested in gardening and local food,” said Seedy Saturday organizer Kathleen Sheppard of Environment Lethbridge. “We have exhibits, workshops and a seed swap. It’s all free for people to come and learn about gardening and plants. And share their knowledge, get some new seeds and meet people. It’s just a great event.”

Sheppard said those who came out were passionate about gardening, curious about growing things in general or eager to get their hands on some seeds for their own local food projects. You can’t rule out cabin fever as a valid motivation either, said Sheppard.

“I think this year people are so ready for spring, and so sick of the snow, that has brought a lot of people out,” she said. “People want to get outside and grow some things. They can at least come here and dream about when spring comes, and what they are going to plant. And think about how those fresh- grown garden tomatoes will taste. You never know what you are going to find. It’s like a seed-hunters treasure trove in here.”

One of those seed-hunters, Jasmine Indenbosch, came out in search of some garden staples, and found all the varieties she was looking for.

“I found a whole lot of tomatoes, butternut squash, spaghetti squash and some peppers,” said an excited Indenbosch, holding up the small bags. “There is a great sense of community here, and I love getting different varieties of seeds.”

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